ERINC - Members

 

Biographies of ERINC Members

University of Louisville


Robert W. Cohn, ERINC Director and Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Distinguished University Scholar, University of Louisville. PhD in Electrical Engineering, Southern Methodist University (1988). Since 1996 he has been the Director of the ElectroOptics Research Institute and Nanotechnology Center. Prior to joining UofL in 1989, he was Member of the Technical Staff, Texas Instruments (1978-1989). Some of the research activities over his career include surface acoustic wave device development; application of spatial light modulators to information processing, diffraction pattern generation and laser trapping/optical tweezers; and development of novel methods for micro- and nanofabrication. He is a Senior Member of IEEE and Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA)
Home Page: The ElectroOptics Research Institute and Nanotechnology Center (ERINC)

 

Stuart J. Williams, ERINC Associate Director and Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University (2009). His research interests include fluid dynamics, micro- and nanofluidics, particle image velocimetry (PIV), Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Lab-on-a-Chip systems, and colloidal self-assembly.
Home Page: S. Williams’ page

 


Thomas A. Berfield, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2008).  His research involves numerous areas of experimental mechanics, particularly for applications related to thin films, MEMS, smart materials, adhesion and fracture behavior of materials, and renewable energy systems.  Some recently funded projects include topics such as buckling stability dynamics for low-frequency vibration energy harvesting and scalable micro-patterning methods using cracking and drying thin films.
Home Page: T. Berfield’s page

 


Bikram Bhatia, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2008).  His research focuses on heat transfer, nanotechnology, advanced materials, and energy systems.
Home Page: B. Bhatia’s page

 


Aly A. Farag, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Director, Computer Vision and Image Processing Laboratory (CVIP lab). Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University (1990). His research focus is model-based computer vision and image understanding with practical and biomedical applications. His contributions have been in active computer vision, image modeling, segmentation, registration, and object reconstruction.
Home Page: A. Farag’s page

 


Joel R. Fried, Professor and Chair, Department of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. in Polymer Science and Engineering from UMASS, Amherst (1976). His research interests are in membrane separation and transport, computational chemistry, molecular simulations, polymer blends and composites, biomimetic membranes, proton transfer in fuel cell membranes, ion and small molecule transport through membrane proteins.
Home Page: J. Fried’s page

 


Xiao-An (Sean) Fu, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University (2001). His research interests include advanced semiconductor thin film growth and characterization, SiC MEMS and NEMS, SiC integrated circuits, gas sensors for harsh environments, nanostructured material synthesis and application.
Home Page: X. Fu’s page

 

 


Omid Ghasemi-Fare, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Ph.D. in Geotechnical Engineering with a Ph.D. minor in Computational Science from Pennsylvania State University (2015). His research experiences are revolved around energy geotechnics, geothermal energy, unsaturated soil mechanics, heat and fluid flow in porous media, THM modeling, transportation geotechnics and geotechnical earthquake engineering.
Home Page: O. Ghasemi-Fare’s page

 


Kunal Kate, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. in Materials Science, Oregon State University (2015). His research interests include developing biodegradable polymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering and bone fabrications, and sustainable polymer-plant fiber composites for structural applications. In this work Dr. Kate is studying the material-structure-property relations and interrelationships between material composition and process conditions on FDM 3D printing. Additionally, Dr. Kate is working on developing materials and design structures out of polymer elastomers and graphite/grapheme-based composites for wear resistances and energy applications. This work builds from his experience in testing fabricated design structures for mechanical wear and strengths along with modeling material properties and testing design structures with FEA analysis.
Home Page: K. Kate’s page

 


Robert S. Keynton, Interim Executive Vice President for Research & Innovation, Professor and Lutz Endowed Chair of Biomechanical Devices, Department of Bioengineering. Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering, University of Akron (1995). His research focuses on Lab-on-a-Chip devices, microsensors, biomedical devices, and biomaterials. He received the Outstanding Young Scientist Award from the Houston Society of Engineering in Medicine and Biology and he is a fellow in both the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the National Academy of Inventors.
Home Page: R. Keynton’s page

 


Jinjun Liu, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry. Ph.D. from the Ohio State University (2007). His research interests include spectroscopic studies on gas-phase molecules and molecular complexes, and condensed-phase materials in both frequency domain (using high-resolution lasers) and time domain (using ultrafast laser systems).
Home Page: The Liu Research Group

 


Shamus McNamara, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Director, Micro/Nano Technology Center. Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI. His research interests include MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS), Nanotechnology, Sensors and Transducers, Miniature Actuators, Lithography, Gas Microfluidics, Lab-on-a-Chip, Microelectronics, and Thermoelectrics.
Home Page: Design and Research of Exciting Applications in Microsystems (DREAM) Laboratory

 


Sergio B. Mendes, Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, joint appointment with Department of Chemistry and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Ph.D. in Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson (1997). His research interests include molecular films, surface phenomena, optical waveguides and fibers, optical spectroscopies of nanostructured materials, optical waves and nanoparticles, optical and laser instrumentation, integrated optic and fiber biosensors.
Home Page: http://www.physics.louisville.edu/sbmendes/

 


Olfa Nasraoui, Professor, Department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science, Endowed Chair of e-commerce and Founding Director of the Knowledge Discovery & Web Mining Lab. Ph.D. in Computer Science and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri – Columbia (1999). Her research includes Data mining, machine learning, mining high dimensional, sparse, heterogeneous or unstructured data and evolving data streams; Web personalization and profiling, intelligent user modeling, intelligent information retrieval and recommender systems.
Home Page: Knowledge Discovery and Web Mining Lab

 


Martin G. O’Toole, Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering. Ph.D in Chemistry, University of Louisville (2008). His research focus is the development of stimulus-responsive biomaterials for applications in drug delivery, diagnosis, wound healing, and other therapeutic applications.
Home Page: M. O’Toole’s page

 

 


Dan O. Popa, Professor and Vogt Endowed Chair of Advanced Manufacturing, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and head of the Next Generation Systems (NGS) research group. Ph.D. in Electrical Computer and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1998). His research includes precision and micro robotics and motion control, Micro/nano assembly and manipulation, Physical human-robot interaction, Social Robotics, Mobile Robot Path Planning
Home Page: Next Gen Systems Group

 


Patricia Soucy, Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering. Ph.D in Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University (2010). Her research focuses on using both synthetic and natural biomaterials as mimics of the natural extracellular matrix to direct cell function for tissue regeneration and for drug delivery applications.
Home Page: P. Soucy’s page

 


Jill Steinbach-Rankins, Professor, Department of Bioengineering. Ph.D in Bioengineering, Arizona State University (2009). Her research focuses on creating drug and gene delivery vehicles that provide more efficacious prophylactics/treatments for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including acute and chronic (latent) infections. In addition to developing better vehicles that specifically target viruses and host cells, significant advancements can be made to rationally design delivery platforms targeted to the unique microenvironments where infection, latency, and reactivation occur.
Home Page: J. Steinbach-Rankins’ page

 


Gamini U. Sumanasekera, Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Associate Director, Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research, joint appointment with Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Ph.D from Indiana University (1995). His research interests include synthesis of various nanostructures, photonic and thermoelectric materials based on synthetic opals, chemical sensors based on single wall carbon nanotubes, Raman spectroscopy, and Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors.
Home Page: Nano-Materials Synthesis and Characterization Labratory (NMSaCL)

 


Thomas R. Tretter, Professor of Science Education, Department of Middle and Secondary Education, Director of Gheens Science Hall & Rauch Planetarium, and Co-Director, Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Teacher Development. Ed.D., Curriculum and Instruction, from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2004). His Research & Scholarship Interests include conceptions of scale and scaling in science, organizing science instruction around unifying themes, incorporating nanoscience and nanotechnology into middle and high school science classrooms, and diagnostic assessments of science teacher knowledge.
Home Page: http://louisville.edu/education/faculty/tretter/

 


Thomas R. Tretter, Professor of Science Education, Department of Middle and Secondary Education, Director of Gheens Science Hall & Rauch Planetarium, and Co-Director, Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Teacher Development. Ed.D., Curriculum and Instruction, from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2004). His Research & Scholarship Interests include conceptions of scale and scaling in science, organizing science instruction around unifying themes, incorporating nanoscience and nanotechnology into middle and high school science classrooms, and diagnostic assessments of science teacher knowledge.
Home Page: http://louisville.edu/education/faculty/tretter/

 


Francis P. Zamborini, Professor, Analytical Chemistry and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry. Ph.D in Chemistry from Texas A&M University (1998). His research interests include catalytic activity of Pd and PdAg MPCs, electrochemical deposition of Ag NRs/NWs, negative shift in potential for oxidation of Au and Ag nanoparticles vs bulk material, and optical properties of coupled nanostructures.
Home Page: Zamborini Research Group

 


Francis P. Zamborini, Professor, Analytical Chemistry and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry. Ph.D in Chemistry from Texas A&M University (1998). His research interests include catalytic activity of Pd and PdAg MPCs, electrochemical deposition of Ag NRs/NWs, negative shift in potential for oxidation of Au and Ag nanoparticles vs bulk material, and optical properties of coupled nanostructures.
Home Page: Zamborini Research Group

 


Francis P. Zamborini, Professor, Analytical Chemistry and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry. Ph.D in Chemistry from Texas A&M University (1998). His research interests include catalytic activity of Pd and PdAg MPCs, electrochemical deposition of Ag NRs/NWs, negative shift in potential for oxidation of Au and Ag nanoparticles vs bulk material, and optical properties of coupled nanostructures.
Home Page: Zamborini Research Group

 


Francis P. Zamborini, Professor, Analytical Chemistry and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry. Ph.D in Chemistry from Texas A&M University (1998). His research interests include catalytic activity of Pd and PdAg MPCs, electrochemical deposition of Ag NRs/NWs, negative shift in potential for oxidation of Au and Ag nanoparticles vs bulk material, and optical properties of coupled nanostructures.
Home Page: Zamborini Research Group

University of Kentucky

Joseph W. Brill, Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Kentucky. Ph.D. in Experimental Solid State Physics from Stanford University (1978). His current research is on novel thermal, elastic, and infrared probes of crystals with “low-dimensional” electronic properties, including microcalorimetry and electro-optical and electro-mechanical measurements of charge-density-wave materials.
Home Page: Condensed Matter Group

 

Beth S. Guiton, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky; joint appointment with Oak Ridge National Laboratory STEM group. Ph.D. from University of Pensylvania. Her current focus is to combine the synthesis and design of new nanostructured materials, with their characterization using advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques ranging from atomic resolution imaging, to more exotic techniques such as plasmon mapping on the nanometer length scale.
Home Page: Guiton Group

 

Laurence G. Hassebrook, Blazie Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky. Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University (1990). His research interests include 3-dimensional data acquistion, pattern recognition, signal and image Processing, and stochastic systems.
Home Page: Signal and Image Processing Research Group

 

 

J. Todd Hastings, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky. Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2003). His research focuses on nano-scale electronic and photonic devices and their associated fabrication technologies.
Home Page: Integrated Nanoscale Engineering

 

J. Zach Hilt, Associate Professor, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky. Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX (2004). His research focuses on designing and developing novel biomaterials based on intelligent polymer networks for application as recognition and/or actuation elements ininnovative devices for biosensing, drug delivery, and other micro- and nanoscale applications, primarily of medical and biological significance.
Home Page: Hilt Laboratory

 

Daniel L. Lau, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky.  Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, University of Delaware (1999). His research interests include digital halftoning, watermarking, and color reproduction, automated surveillance and face recognition,  and human-computer interaction and assistive technologies research for persons with disabilities.
Home Page: Dr. Lau’s Research and Teaching Site

 

Janet K. Lumpp, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky. Ph.D. in Materials Engineering from the University of Iowa (1993). Her primary research interests are in materials, lasers and microelectronics. Her research projects center on developing micromachining techniques for hybrid microelectronics, prototype component fabrication, and diffractive optics. She is also interested in studying laser processing of electronic, optical and magnetic materials to determine laser-solid interaction mechanisms in deposition and removal processes.
Home Page: Dr. Lumpp Research and Teaching Site

 

Douglas Strachan, Assistant Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Kentucky. Ph.D. in Physics from University of Maryland (2002). His research interests include novel nanoscale electronic and photonic materials and devices, soft matter and colloidal systems, phase transitions and vortices in superconductors.
Home Page: Dr. Strachan Group

 

Western Kentucky University

 


Vladimir Dobrokhotov
, Assistant Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Director of Applied Physics Institute, Western Kentucky University. His research interests include experimental and theoretical condensed matter physics, synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, and sensor applicatios of one-dimensional nanostructures.
Home Page: Applied Physics Institute

 

Academic Affiliates (involved in collaborative research)


Doo Jin Cho, Professor, Department of Physics, Ajou University, South Korea. Ph.D. in Optics from the Institute of Optics, University of Rochester (1990). His research interests include optical/nanophotonic computer simulations.

 

 

 


Bruce J. Hinds, Campbell Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, WA. Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from Northwestern University (1996). His research areas include nano-scale device fabrication, molecular electronics/spintronics, thin film processes, semiconductor interface states and inorganic chemical synthesis.
Home Page: B. Hinds’ Lab

 


Wenyao Liu, Professor, Department of Precision Instrument Engineering, Tianjin University, China. Visiting Prof., UofL, 1995. He is currently engaged in research on optical pattern recognition techniques and optical correlations.

 


Pinar Meng��, Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas.
Home Page: Dr. Meng�� Research and Teaching Site

 

 

 


Alexander F. Naumov, Ph.D., Senior Scientists, Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Samara, Russia. He currently works at Physical Optics Corporation.

 

 


A. V. Parfenov, Ph.D., Senior Scientists, Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, who is widely recognized as Russia’s leading developer of liquid crystal modulators for high definition and brightness projectors and adaptive optical telescopes. He is currently working with fiber-optic sensors at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University.

 


Henry Stark, Professor Emeritus, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology. Fellow of OSA and IEEE. His publications on convex and generalized projections onto constraints algorithms and their applications to reconstruction imaging, pattern recognition and optical design are widely cited.

 

Corporate Affiliates


Frank Luecke, founder and owner of Frank Design LLC in Crestwood, Kentucky. He is also co-founder of New Focus Inc. and is responsible for the design of around 75% of their products including picomotors, optical, and tunable laser diodes. Prior to New Focus he worked at IBM on the research and development of magneto-optical disc drives. He is the inventor or co-inventor on over 27 U.S. patents. Currently he is involved in research and design projects with Professors Farag and Cohn and the Dept. of Surgery at UofL’s medical school

 


John Randall and Marni Rutkofsky are Chief Technical Officer and Nanomaterials Specialist of Zyvex Corp. Zyvex’s vision is to become the leading worldwide supplier of tools, products, and services that enable adaptable, affordable, and molecularly precise manufacturing.

 


Jay E. Stockley and Steven A. Serati, are Electro-optics Engineer and President of Boulder Nonlinear system, Inc. which makes Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator for information processing. They are currently collaborating on an STTR contract to develop a real-time multispot laser beam steering system and illuminator.

 

Former Members


Bruce W. Alphenaar, Professor and Chair, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Yale University. In October 2000, he joined the University of Louisville as an Associate Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering with the distinction of University Scholar in Nanotechnology.  His latest research includes carbon nanotube spintronics, optically excited spin injection and nanowire interconnects and devices.
Home Page: Alphenaar Research Group

 


Darrel L. Chenoweth, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Director of Graduate Studies and Assistant V.P. for Research, University of Louisville. Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, Auburn University. Fellow of the Institute of Electrical Engineers (IEE). He has performed research on computer vision based navigation, analysis of aerial reconnaissance images, characterization of long range infrared search and track systems.

 


Elizabeth C. Dickey, Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University. Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University (1997). Her research inteinterests include statics and dynamics of point-defects, grain boundaries, and interfaces in materials; nanomaterials; functional oxides; ceramic composites; and electron microscopy.
Website: http://www.mse.ncsu.edu/profile/ecdickey

 


Edward A. Essock, Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and University Scholar. Ph.D. in Psychology from Brown University (1981). His current research interests include visual art and aesthetics, perception of natural scenes, encoding of natural scenes/ Cortical gain-control, biases in perception of oriented stimuli (lines, edges, noise), clinical vision (e.g., Prediction of Glaucoma, Cataracts and vision), and applied (Human Factors) vision.
Home Page: Visual Perception Laboratory

 


Peter Faguy, Electrochemist, Energy Storage at U.S. Department of Energy, Owner of Delta Biosensing. His area of interests include new product development, program management, characterization and performance testing, electrode materials and production, electrocatalysts, analytical instrumentation and sensors, and providing consulting services and solutions at the science / engineering / business interface.

 


Andrea S. Gobin, Associate Professor, Department of Bioengineering. Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Rice University(2003). Her research interest is to develop biomaterials with mimics in structure and/or function of natural extracellular matrices (ECM) for basic science and tissue engineering applications. Understanding how the structural and functional components of ECM proteins interact and how to implement these relationships in synthetic environments can aid in developing novel biomaterials to use as instruments and tools in building basic science knowledge as well as scaffolds for tissue engineering.
Home Page: BioMimetics Laboratory

 


Andr� M. Gobin, Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering. Ph.D. from Rice University, Houston, TX. His research interests include near infrared (NIR) absorbing nanoparticles for uses including as a therapeutic agent directly, incorporation into drug delivery systems as well as in photo-mechanical transduction systems coupled into micro-fluidic devices.
Home Page: Nanotherapeutics Laboratory

 


Cindy K. Harnett, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Ph.D. degree in Applied and Engineering Physics from Cornell University (2000). Her research interests include chemical vapor deposition in micro scale environments, interaction of electric fields with fluid flows, use of microfluidic systems to produce new electronic materials, and ultra low-power environmental sensors.
Home Page: Harnett Laboratory

 


Chakram S. Jayanthi, Professor and Chairperson, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Ph.D from Indian Institute of Technology. She is presently pursuing research on theoretical condensed matter physics, surface physics and large scale atomistic simulations.
Home Page: Condensed Matter Theory (CMT) Group

 

 

 


Shudun Liu, Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Ph.D. from Rutgers University (1991). His research interests include modeling the growth mechanisms of thin films and nanostructures based on Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques and the rate equation theory.
Home Page: Condensed Matter Physics

 

 

 


John F. Naber, Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (1992). His research involves developing custom analog and digital circuits to meet the needs of advanced implantable biomedical sensing systems as well as integrated Lab-On-a-Chip (LOC) systems.
Home Page: Wireless and IC Design Laboratory

 


Balaji Panchapakesan, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland at College Park (2001). His research focuses on understanding how light interacts with carbon nanotubes and creating applications as diverse as micro-opto-mechanical systems to cancer nanotechnology that utilize this phenomenon.
Home Page: Small System Laboratory (SSL)

 


W. Karl Pitts, Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville; currently Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Ph.D from Indiana University. His research interests include radiation detectors, laser micromachining, nuclear physics and instrumentation development.

 


Palaniappan Sethu, Associate Professor, Department of Bioengineering. Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (2002). His research focuses on providing enabling technology through the development of microfluidic systems for applications in biology and medicine.
Home Page: Microscale Biotechnology Laboratory

 

 


M. Keith Sharp, Retired Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Renewable Energy Applications Laboratory (REAL). Sc.D. in Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1987). His research interests included biofluid mechanics (esp. blood flow and cardiovascular modeling) and renewable and sustainable energy.
Home Page: M.K. Sharp’s page

 

 


Susan B. Sinnott, Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Director, Cyberinfrastructure for Atomistic Materials Science (CAMS), University of Florida. Ph.D in Physical Chemistry from Iowa State University (1993). She is presently pursuing research on the design and study of new composite material, computational nanometer-scale materials engineering, investigation of crack initiation at material defects, and the study of thin film growth.
Home Page: http://sinnott.mse.ufl.edu/

 


Kevin M. Walsh, Samuel T. Fife Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Founding Director of UofL Micro/Nano Technology Center (MNTC). Ph.D from University of Cincinnati (1992). His research interests include MEMS, Microelectronic Devices, Sensors, Transducers and Actuators, Micro/Nanofabrication Processes and Device Physics.
Home Page: Micro/Nano Technology Center (MNTC)

 


Shi-Yu Wu, Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Ph.D from Cornell University (1967). He is presently pursuing research on theoretical condensed matter physics and theory of complex systems with reduced symmetry.
Home Page: Condensed Matter Theory (CMT) group