Core Courses

 

ERINC – Core Courses

Nanoelectronics and MEMS
ECE 542 Physical Electronics

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms governing semiconductor device behavior. We will discuss the electronic properties of semiconductors, and how we can take advantage of these properties to create basic semiconductor device components (pn diodes, photodiodes and transistors). A thorough appreciation of these concepts will provide a basis for further study in electronic circuit design, materials characterization, electrical measurements, and advanced device design and characterization. Instructor: Dr. Alphenaar

ECE 543 Fundamentals of Microfabrication and MEMS

This course is designed as an introduction to the fundamentals of microfabrication technology and its application to the fields of MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) and general microelectronics. Various aspects of MEMS technology and its numerous applications are presented. Computer simulation and design tools for MEMS and microfabrication processes are implemented. Instructor: Dr. Walsh

ECE 544 MEMS LAB

Laboratory to illustrate microfabrication processes, semiconductor measurement techniques, MEMS microstructure fabrication, and MEMS testing. Cleanroom activity required. Instructor: Dr. Walsh

ECE 674 Nanotechnology

Recently there have been profound advances in man’s ability to physically interact in with small numbers of molecules and even individual atoms. In addition to the fundamental scientific discoveries, practical technologies have been developed and (e.g. in the case of surface profiling microscopes) have been rapidly and successfully commercialized. Today’s research is likely to lead in the next decade to single electronic memory chips that have more storage than today’s largest hard drives, bioprobes that can chemically sense and perform reactions at selected molecules within a single living cell, computing chips that are based on the quantum interference between single electrons, and materials, structures and electronic devices self-assembled through our detailed knowledge of chemical affinities. Thus, nanotechnology is expected to dramatically change electronics, computers, manufacturing, medicine, and the physical sciences over the coming years. This special topics course will survey the current state-of-the-art in Nanotechnology through selected readings, special topic reports from the students, and invited guest lecturers from researchers in the field. Instructor: Dr. Cohn

ECE 675 Nanostructure Self-Assembly

The course is designed to explore the concept of self-assembly, which is describes processes that enable crude directions to evolve into precisely assembled and positioned nanostructures that can exhibit unusual geometries and functions. The objectives of the course are (1) to develop in each student an understanding of the physical principles that are responsible for self-assembly, (2) to familiarize each student with systems that demonstrate self-assembly at the nanoscale and (3) have each student consider potential applications of nanostructure self-assembly that are currently being pursued by researchers that potentially may enhance and simplify fabrication of electronic devices and multi-functional microsystems. Instructor: Dr. Cohn.

ECE 676 Foundations of Polymer MEMS

We use polymers everyday without thinking about them. This is especially true of the BRB device and MEMS researchers who use polymers extensively in fabrication processing as well as the material of choice for realizing enhanced device functionality. In order to be more creative users we need to develop a background in polymers and their physical properties. This special topics course is designed to give engineers and science students a general reading background of polymers. The course includes readings on polymer properties from a leading textbook, together with independent readings and reports to the class by students on special topics of interest to them and their ongoing or potentially planned research. Instructor: Dr. Cohn.

ECE 600 Advanced MEMS

ECE 600-02 Advanced Device Electronics

ECE 600-1 Semiconductor Principles

ECE 600-03 The MOSFET

ME 659 Micro Pressure and Flow Sensors for Biomedical Applications

ME 660 Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design

Nanomaterials Growth and Characterization
CHE 594 Chemical Vapor Deposition

Understand the concepts involved in the deposition of thin and thick films using various Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) methods. Apply chemical kinetics (gas phase and gas-solid), thermodynamics and transport concepts to understand the chemical vapor deposition process. Understand the nucleation and growth aspects of the vapor grown crystalline and amorphous films. Instructor: Dr. Sunkara

CHE 600 Surfaces and Nanomaterials Characterization

Instructor: Dr. Sunkara

ECE 674 Nanotechnology

Recently there have been profound advances in man’s ability to physically interact in with small numbers of molecules and even individual atoms. In addition to the fundamental scientific discoveries, practical technologies have been developed and (e.g. in the case of surface profiling microscopes) have been rapidly and successfully commercialized. Today’s research is likely to lead in the next decade to single electronic memory chips that have more storage than today’s largest hard drives, bioprobes that can chemically sense and perform reactions at selected molecules within a single living cell, computing chips that are based on the quantum interference between single electrons, and materials, structures and electronic devices self-assembled through our detailed knowledge of chemical affinities. Thus, nanotechnology is expected to dramatically change electronics, computers, manufacturing, medicine, and the physical sciences over the coming years. This special topics course will survey the current state-of-the-art in Nanotechnology through selected readings, special topic reports from the students, and invited guest lecturers from researchers in the field. Instructor: Dr. Cohn

ECE 675 Nanostructure Self-Assembly

The course is designed to explore the concept of self-assembly, which is describes processes that enable crude directions to evolve into precisely assembled and positioned nanostructures that can exhibit unusual geometries and functions. The objectives of the course are (1) to develop in each student an understanding of the physical principles that are responsible for self-assembly, (2) to familiarize each student with systems that demonstrate self-assembly at the nanoscale and (3) have each student consider potential applications of nanostructure self-assembly that are currently being pursued by researchers that potentially may enhance and simplify fabrication of electronic devices and multi-functional microsystems. Instructor: Dr. Cohn.

Image Analysis and Psychophysics
Content ECE 618/635 Digital Image Processing and Lab

Introduction to the theory and applications of 2-D signal and image processing: 2-D signals and systems analysis, 2-D sampling and quantization, 2-D signals and image transforms, 2-D FIR filter design; image formation; image enhancement; image restoration; image coding; image reconstruction from projections; image compression; color image processing; current applications. Instructor: Dr. Farag

ECE 619/645 Computer Vision and Lab

Introduction to the theory and applications of computer vision. Topics include: image formation, camera models, camera calibration, 3-D model building by stereo vision, shape from motion and shape from shading/texture. Students should have a solid capability in linear algebra, and a familiarity with numerical techniques and geometry. Some programming experience is expected as well as an understanding of the issues in artificial intelligence. A background in digital image processing (acquired through the ECE618 course) is encouraged. Instructor: Dr. Farag

ECE 620/655 Pattern Recognition and Lab

Introduction: Fundamentals of statistical, structural, and syntactic pattern recognition approaches. Parametric and nonparametric classification, feature extraction, clustering, and formal languages representation. Applications include: Data classification, character recognition, speech recognition, and target tracking. Instructor: Dr. Farag

ECE 641 Introduction to Medical Imaging

Focuses on the foundation of modern medical imaging. Mathematics, hardware and software issues of modern medical imaging are covered. Topics include: Optical image formation, MRI, CT, Ultrasound, and PET. Bioinstrumentation for EKG, EEG, and EMG will also be covered in the context of biomedical signal processing. Topics also include computer-assisted interventions, multi-modality imaging, volume visualization, surface registration and geometric modeling. Instructor: Dr. Farag

PSYC 404 Vision and Art

This course will blend the biology of seeing with an examination of visual art. The bulk of the material will be from an excellent book, “The Eye of the Artist”, a “coffee-table book” written by two ophthalmologists with strong art backgrounds that examines the works of about a dozen masters with respect to their techniques and possible eye problems. Other readings will be from “Inner Vision” in which a notable neuroscientist, Semir Zeki, presents his ideas that art aesthetics directly reflect brain function and brain specialization. Finally, selected topics will be from “The Artful Eye”, edited by several notable English visual perception scientists. Instructor: Dr. Essock

PSYC 632 Principles of Visual Science

An introduction to the structure and functioning of the visual system including normal and disrupted visual performance. The course surveys and integrates findings from neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, psychophysical and clinical research. Instructor: Dr. Essock

PSYC 633 Visual Processes

A consideration of the low-level processes and mechanisms of seeing, including: (1) the sampling and filtering of the image in the eye, (2) the neural representation of the image, and (3) the interpretation of this representation. Emphasis in Visual Processes is on form, color and motion abilities. Instructor: Dr. Essock

PSYC 634 Intermediate Vision

In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in the field of Intermediate Vision, largely due to advances in neuroscience and computer technologies. Consequently, Intermediate Vision has evolved into a multidisciplinary subject. In concert with this trend, the following four topics to be covered in this course will emphasize the integration of the various approaches such as psychophysics, cognition, neuroscience, computational theory, etc. I. Stereopsis and 3-D Space Perception; II. Texture Segregation and Visual Search; III. Visual Surface Perception; IV. Structure from Motion. Instructor: Dr. Essock

Optics and ElectroMagnetics
ECE 473 Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

Prerequisite: Professional school standing. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic properties of matter, uniform plane waves, transmission lines. Instructor: Dr. Harnett

ECE 540 Laser and ElectroOptical Systems

Review of basic electromagnetic. ABCD law; higher order Gaussian beam modes. Optical resonators: interaction of radiation and atomic systems. Laser oscillation: three and four level systems. Non-linear optics: second-harmonic generation, parametric oscillation and electro-optic modulation. Laser applications in information processing, computers and communications.

ECE 541 Engineering Optical Lab

Computer aided design-oriented series of fundamental optics experiments ranging from thin lens experiments, diffraction, interference, laser coherence and birefringence. Abbe theory. Laser cavity design, and modal property measurements in optical waveguides and fiber optics. Instructor:

ECE 545 Optical Signal Processing

Scalar diffraction theory and equivalence to linear filtering. Fourier transform properties of lenses. The modulation transfer function. Optical processors and holography. Recent trends in optical processing and computing. Instructor:

ECE 569 Intermediate Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

Prerequisite: Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (ECE 473). General curvilinear coordinates. Electromagnetic energy transmission. The wave equation, Poynting theorem and plane wave propagation in media. Transmission lines and impedance matching. Instructor: Dr. Harnett

ECE 642 Fiber Optics and Integrated Optical Systems

Propagation of electromagnetic waves in dielectric media. Phase and group velocity. Eikonal equation. Ray and wave theory of uniform and graded index planar and channel optical waveguides and optical fibers. Design and fabrication techniques for waveguides and integrated optical devices. Semiconductor laser and modulator design. Instructor: Dr. Cox

ECE 646 Optical Computer Architecture

Scalar diffraction theory and equivalence to linear filtering. Fourier transform properties of lenses. The modulation transfer function. Optical processors and holography. Recent trends in optical processing and computing.

ECE 647 Fundamentals of Photonics and Optoelectronics

Introduction to fundamental properties, components and theories used to build optical systems for broad bandwidth telecommunications, computing, sensing and information processing. Instructor: Dr. Cox

ECE 670 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory

Prerequisite: ECE 569 or equivalent. General curvilinear coordinates. Applications of Maxwell’s equations. Boundary conditions. Uniform and nonuniform transmission lines. Scalar and vector potentials. Dielectric and magnetic properties of matter. Complete and partial wave polarization. Interaction of waves and matter. Reflection and refraction of waves at boundaries. Wave propagation in anisotropic media. Energy and momentum of electromagnetic waves. Instructor: Dr. Cox

Physics 355/6 Optics and Lab

Relation between light waves and rays; theory of thick lenses and lens aberrations; interference and diffraction of coherent light. Laboratory experiments illustrating the reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, and polarization of light. (2 hour Laboratory Course) Instructor:

Physics 545/6 Advanced Optics and Lab

Topics in optical physics including optical system design, lasers and quantum optics. Laboratory experiments illustrating fundamental optical phenomena, the interaction of light and matter, lasers, and quantum optics. (1 hour Laboratory Course) Instructor: Dr. Cox

Physics 611 Electromagnetic Theory I & II

Microscopic and macroscopic Maxwell’s equations; The energy momentum tensor; multipole radiation; radiation from accelerated charges; scattering and dispersion; and covariant formulation. Instructor: Dr. Liu

Computational Nonmaterial & Physics
Physics 565 Computational Physics

Introduction to modern computational methods in physics with application to problems in different branches of physics. Instructor: Dr. Jayanthi

Physics 621 Quantum Mechanics I & II

Non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Hilbert space formalism, Schr�dinger and Heisenberg representations, angular momentum theory, perturbation theory, scattering theory. Systems of identical particles and symmetries. Instructor: Dr. Wu

Physics 625 Stat Mechanics

Application of ensemble or information theory to derivation of the laws of thermodynamics for classical or quantum systems. Properties of perfect and imperfect gases, magnetic phenomena, fluctuation phenomena, and the Onsager equations. Instructor: Dr. Liu.

BioMedical and Engineering
BE 101 Intro to BioEngineering

Instructor: Dr. Keynton.

BE 360 BioMechanics Principles

Instructor: Dr. Sethu.

BE 360 BioMechanics Principles

Engineering modeling and simulation of biological systems, quantitative physiology of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and circulation systems, fundamentals of biomechanics and human-machine interface, basics of medical instrumentation design, and artificial organs. Practical applications include bio-potential amplifiers design, biological signal processing, and medical imaging. Instructor: Dr. Farag.

ME 659 Micro Pressure and Flow Sensors for Biomedical Applications

Application of microtechnologies to the development of practical pressure and flow sensors for biomedical applications. Overview of micro-fabrication processes and conventional flow/pressure sensing devices. Application-specific criteria supporting the need for miniaturization. Design principles and constraints. Students are required to design either a micro flow or pressure sensor for a specific biomedical application.. Instructor: Dr. Keynton.

UK Members’ Courses (Offered at UK)
ECE 635 Digital Image Processing

The ECE Department describes this course as, “outlining applications of image processing and addresses basic operations involved with topics covered including image perception, transformations, compression, enhancement, restoration, segmentation, and matching.” I would like to add that this course will draw on my experiences in printer design to relate basic course concepts to real consumer imaging problems that students may be exposed to in industry. Instructor: Dr. Lau.

EE 360 Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

Understand the electronic properties of semiconductor materials.Calculate carrier concentrations and currents in semiconductor devices. Understand the fabrication technologies used to fabricate integrated circuits. Understand the physics and models of semiconductor devices including diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field-effect transistors. Analyze various device structures and calculate their model parameters. Instructor: Dr. Hastings.

EE 560 Semiconductor Device Design

Theory, development and discussion of equivalent circuit models of transistor devices, negative resistance, semiconductor devices and praetersonic devices based on electronic processes in solid state elements. High and low frequency, as well as the Ebers-Moll and charge control switching models and their application in computerized electronic circuits analysis will be developed. Instructor: Dr. Lumpp.

EE 568 Fiber Optics

UK Members’ Courses (Offered at UK)

The course presents theory and practice related to (a) fiber optic cable and their fabrication, (b) fiber optic transmitters and detectors, (c) fiber optic communication systems and (d) fiber optic remote sensors. Instructor: Dr. Lumpp.

EE 661 Solid-State Electronics

The overall objectives of this course are for the student to understand the basic physics of semiconductor materials and to be able to analyze solid-state electronic devices. Instructor: Dr. Hastings.

ME 599 Thermal Sciences at Nanoscalee 659

This course will introduce you to the concepts of nano-scale thermal sciences. You will understand the fundamentals of energy carriers, including photons, phonons, electrons, and molecules; conceptualize wave and particle formulations. The topics to be discussed includes statistical thermodynamics, energy transfer via electron, electromagnetic, acoustic waves; Boltzmann equation and particle-model based transport phenomena; conduction and radiation analyses for thin films and rarefied gas flow models; Schrodinger equation and its solution for different systems; the details of energy states in solids. You will develop the skills necessary to identify and analyze different modes of energy transfer and their interactions. You will learn to setup the governing equations of different systems at nano-scale and solve the equations for simple geometries. You will learn to read and interpret the papers published in scientific and trade journals to stay on top of your field. Instructor: Dr. Meng��.

MSE 585 Materials Characterization Techniques

This course will focus on the most powerful of the materials characterization techniques, namely x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and electron imaging through theoretical coursework and hands-on laboratory exercises. A survey of the fundamentals of surface science, chemical analysis and scanning probe techniques will also be introduced. Instructor: Dr. Hinds.

MSE 632 Advanced Materials Science

This course will focus on the learning of topics related to the synthesis and properties of nano-scale materials. Synthetic approaches will be related to fundamental surface science, nucleation and growth mechanism and thermodynamics. Chemical activity, electronic and mechanical properties of nanomaterial systems will be studied. Specific materials systems that result in nano-structured materials as well as a variety of nano-fabrication techniques will be surveyed and analyzed. Another critical goal of the course to demonstrate the process of in-depth learning of a current research topic from relatively shallow introductory text commonly found in emerging topic areas. Instructor: Dr. Hinds.

PHY 306 Theoretical Methods of Physics

Physics 306 is a sophomore-level course designed to help give you the analytical mathematics tools to succeed in upper division physics and other physical science courses. It will complement Math 213 and Math 214 (a co-requisite), but the emphasis will be on application of mathematical techniques rather than on derivations and proofs. Topics to be covered include series of real and complex variables, multivariable and vector calculus, Fourier series and transforms, and differential equations. Instructor: Dr. Brill.