Angela Thompson

Assoc Professor

Angela Thompson, PhD, PE is an Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering Fundamentals at the University of Louisville. She currently teaches Engineering, Methods, Tools and Practice I (an introductory course for first-year students) and Engineering Analysis courses. She received her PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Louisville in 2011. Her research interests are in pediatric injury biomechanics and engineering education for first-year students.

Education

  • B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Louisville, 2005
  • MSE in Mechanical Engineering, University of Louisville, 2007
  • Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Louisville, 2011

Publications

Femur morphology in healthy infants and young children- 2021

The objective of this study was to characterize femur morphology in healthy infants and young children. Anterior-posterior (AP) radiographs of the femur from children age 0-3 years with no history of bone disease were obtained from two children's hospitals and one medical examiner's office. Femur morphological measures (bone length, minimum diaphysis diameter, growth plate width, and femur radius of curvature) and sectional structural measures were determined. Measures were described and compared based on subject age and mass. Relationships between measures and age and mass were evaluated. The 169 AP femur radiographs were obtained from 99 children (59.6% males, median age = 12.0 months, IQR = 0-27.5 months, median body weight = 10.0 kg, IQR = 4.4-15.6 kg). Femur length (r  = 0.97, p < 0.001; r  = 0.89, p < 0.001), trochanter width (r  = 0.86, p < 0.001; r  = 0.85, p < 0.001), minimum diaphysis diameter (r  = 0.91, p < 0.001; r  = 0.87, p < 0.001), and growth plate width (r  = 0.91, p < 0.001; r  = 0.84, p < 0.001) increased with age and weight, respectively. Cross-sectional area (r  = 0.87; r  = 0.86; p < 0.01), polar moment of inertia (r  = 0.91; r  = 0.87; p < 0.001), moment of inertia (r  = 0.91; r  = 0.87; p < 0.001), polar modulus (r  = 0.91; r  = 0.87; p < 0.001) and medullary canal diameter (r  = 0.83, p < 0.001; r  = 0.73, p < 0.001) at the minimum diaphysis also increased with age and weight, respectively. Changes during rapid bone growth are important to understanding fracture risk in infants and young children as they transition to independent walking. Femur length, trochanter width, minimum diaphysis diameter and growth plate width increased with age and weight. Structural properties associated with fracture resistance also increased with age and weight.

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